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Posts Tagged ‘ IRNA ’

  • 1 February 2010
  • Posted By Nayda Lakelieh
  • 2 Comments
  • Diplomacy, Legislative Agenda, Nuclear file

Tehran dismisses another US sanction

Last Thursday the US senate passed a broad, indiscriminate sanctions bill that would restrict Iran’s importation of petroleum; predictably this move was promptly dismissed by authorities in Tehran. It is reported, (via www.presstv.com) that Ramin Mehman-Parast, Iran’s Foreign Ministry spokesman told the Islamic Republic News Agency (IRNA) that the US will not persuade Iran to give up any “legal rights” to its nuclear program, as Iran has adamantly claimed that the nuclear program is in line with Iran’s commitment to the Nuclear Non-proliferation Treaty.

We have repeatedly said that the US sanctions imposed against our nation during the past 31 years … have resulted in nothing but our nations’ stronger determination to assert independence and achieve self-reliance,” [Mehman-Parast] said.

The Senate bill will require President Obama to punish foreign companies that export gasoline to Iran.

Additionally, Press TV also reports that senior Iranian lawmaker Gholam-Ali Haddad-Adel gave a speech on Monday, stating that Tehran will stand firmly by its cause regardless if the US is trying to gain universal consensus for sanctions against Iran, conveying that Iran’s national response to the world powers is “Independence, freedom and the Islamic Republic.”

The Iranian nation conveys this message to arrogant and bullying powers that it will firmly support its independence, freedom and ideals,” said Gholam-Ali Haddad-Adel on Monday in a speech on the occasion of the start of ceremonies marking the 31st anniversary of the victory of the Islamic Revolution in Iran.
“We will not bow to pressure [of bullying powers] concerning our legal right to peaceful nuclear technology”.

At War With God? Iran Accuses 5 Protestors of Warring Against God

Nazila Fathi reports that at least five of the protesters  arrested during the Ashura protests last week are being tried for the crime of “warring against God,” a crime that can ultimately lead to a death sentence. The severity and charge of the crime coming so soon after the protesters’ arrest demonstrates that the Islamic Republic is increasing efforts to bully protesters, hoping to (perhaps literally) kill the dispute over the June presidential election.

In a statement carried by IRNA, Iran’s official news agency, the judiciary said that the five would soon be tried by the revolutionary court on charges of “Moharebeh,” meaning waging war against God, which is punishable by death according to the penal code. The statement did not disclose the names of the defendants, when they would be tried or any details of accusations against them.

A representative of the supreme religious leader, Ayatollah Ali Khamenei, characterized protesters during a speech at a pro-government rally last week as “followers of the path of Satan.”

The fact that the indictment was put together on the newly-expedited timelines cause for even more skepticism regarding the case.

  • 2 December 2009
  • Posted By Lloyd Chebaclo
  • 0 Comments
  • Events in Iran, Human Rights in Iran

Iran whistleblower poisoned

AP reports today that prosecutors say 26-year-old Dr. Ramin Pourandarjani, a doctor at the Kahrizak detention facility in Iran, died of an overdose of Propranolol, a drug used to treat hypertension, found in his salad through forensic tests. The suspicious circumstances surrounding Pourandarjani’s death prompted further investigation and calls to action by human rights groups, amid speculation by opposition groups that he was killed because of his knowledge of torture and abuses in the Kahrizak prison, which was closed in July. He had testified before a parliamentary committee and reportedly said that “one young protestor he treated died from heavy torture.”

AP:

“Investigators are still trying to determine whether his death was a suicide or murder, Tehran’s public prosecutor Abbas Dowlatabadi said, according to the state news agency IRNA.”

Our readers will recall conflicting accounts of what transpired, including first  that Pourandarjani’s father was called by authorities who told him his son was injured in a car accident, requiring his consent for a surgery. His father arrived only to find his son dead. Ismail Ahmadi Moghaddam, Iran’s top police commander called the death a suicide, citing a note found by the body. Pourandarjani’s father maintains that his son was in good spirits, his voice was “full of hope,” that he had been making plans with friends when he spoke to his son the night before his death.

Investigators questioned the restaurant delivery man but he is not under arrest, Dowlatabadi said. The delivery man said he gave the salad directly to Pourandarjani, describing how the doctor took it from him at the door of his room, then closed the door behind him. […]

The doctor’s father, Reza-Qoli Pourandarjani, told The Associated Press last month that he didn’t believe any of the causes given so far by the government in his son’s death. But he didn’t go as far as accusing authorities of killing his son.

  • 21 September 2009
  • Posted By Matthew Negreanu
  • 0 Comments
  • Events in Iran, Human Rights in Iran, Iran Election 2009

Attacks on Khomeini grandson grow as he reaches out to reformist camp

According to parlemannews, the grandson of Ayatollah Ruhollah Khomeini visited the families of imprisoned reformist figures on the day marking the end of Ramadan.  Seyyed Hassan Khomeini, along with other members of his family, visited the families of the following jailed reformist leaders: Mirdamadi (Secretary General of the Participation Front), Tajzadeh, Nabavi, Tajerniya, Arabsorkhi and Tabatabaei. In this meeting, the families thanked him and provided him with the lastest news from Evin prison.

Meanwhile, local sources reported last week that Mehdi Mirdamadi was arrested, while his father has been in prison for more than 90 days.  Prior to this, Saeed Hajjarian’s son was arrested and interrogated. After that Atefe Imam, the 18-year old daughter of Javad Imam too was kidnapped and then released in the deserts around Tehran. The arrests of children of prominent reformists, entered a new phase with the arrest of children of members of Qom’s Theological Center Research centre and also ayatollah Montazeri’s grandchildren.

Hojatoleslam Hassan Khomeini, has been harshly criticized recently by the hardliner media, specifically Kayhan and IRNA for his support of the reformist camp, accusing him of colluding with the reformist leaders and activists.

Kayhan also explicitly attacked the institute’s head and the revolutionary founder’s grandson, Hassan Khomeini, accusing him of being “suspiciously” silent against the clear manipulation of ayatollah Khomeini’s ideas by ayatollah Yousef Sanei, Mohammad Khatami, and Mehdi Karoubi.  Kayhan noted that Hassan Khomeini’s silence cannot mean anything but cooperation with the “manipulators.” IRNA, which supports the Ahmadinejad administration, also attacked Khatami and Mousavi-Khoeiniha, who heads the Assembly of Combatant Clergy [Majma Rohaniyoon Mobarez], accusing them of falling in line with the “enemy’s plan to overthrow” the Islamic republic and attacked Hassan Khomeini’s “support” of these “elements” as unjustifiable, according to roozonline.

Sign the Petition

 

7,349 signatures

Tell Google: Stop playing Persian Gulf name games!

May 14, 2012
Larry Page
Chief Executive Officer
Google Inc.
1600 Amphitheatre Parkway
Mountain View, California 94043

Dear Mr. Page:

It has come to our attention that Google has begun omitting the title of the Persian Gulf from its Google Maps application. This is a disconcerting development given the undisputed historic and geographic precedent of the name Persian Gulf, and the more recent history of opening up the name to political, ethnic, and territorial disputes. However unintentionally, in adopting this practice, Google is participating in a dangerous effort to foment tensions and ethnic divisions in the Middle East by politicizing the region’s geographic nomenclature. Members of the Iranian-American community are overwhelmingly opposed to such efforts, particularly at a time when regional tensions already have been pushed to the brink and threaten to spill over into conflict. As the largest grassroots organization in the Iranian-American community, the National Iranian American Council (NIAC) calls on Google to not allow its products to become propaganda tools and to immediately reinstate the historically accurate, apolitical title of “Persian Gulf” in all of its informational products, including Google Maps.

Historically, the name “Persian Gulf” is undisputed. The Greek geographer and astronomer Ptolemy referencing in his writings the “Aquarius Persico.” The Romans referred to the "Mare Persicum." The Arabs historically call the body of water, "Bahr al-Farsia." The legal precedent of this nomenclature is also indisputable, with both the United Nations and the United States Board of Geographic Names confirming the sole legitimacy of the term “Persian Gulf.” Agreement on this matter has also been codified by the signatures of all six bordering Arab countries on United Nations directives declaring this body of water to be the Persian Gulf.

But in the past century, and particularly at times of escalating tensions, there have been efforts to exploit the name of the Persian Gulf as a political tool to foment ethnic division. From colonial interests to Arab interests to Iranian interests, the opening of debate regarding the name of the Persian Gulf has been a recent phenomenon that has been exploited for political gain by all sides. Google should not enable these politicized efforts.

In the 1930s, British adviser to Bahrain Sir Charles Belgrave proposed to rename the Persian Gulf, “Arabian Gulf,” a proposal that was rejected by the British Colonial and Foreign offices. Two decades later, the Anglo-Iranian Oil Company resurrected the term during its dispute with Mohammad Mossadegh, the Iranian Prime Minister whose battle with British oil interests would end in a U.S.-sponsored coup d'état that continues to haunt U.S.-Iran relations. In the 1960s, the title “Arabian Gulf” became central to propaganda efforts during the Pan-Arabism era aimed at exploiting ethnic divisions in the region to unite Arabs against non-Arabs, namely Iranians and Israelis. The term was later employed by Saddam Hussein to justify his aims at territorial expansion. Osama Bin Laden even adopted the phrase in an attempt to rally Arab populations by emphasizing ethnic rivalries in the Middle East.

We have serious concerns that Google is now playing into these efforts of geographic politicization. Unfortunately, this is not the first time Google has stirred controversy on this topic. In 2008, Google Earth began including the term “Arabian Gulf” in addition to Persian Gulf as the name for the body of water. NIAC and others called on you then to stop using this ethnically divisive propaganda term, but to no avail. Instead of following the example of organizations like the National Geographic Society, which in 2004 used term “Arabian Gulf” in its maps but recognized the error and corrected it, Google has apparently decided to allow its informational products to become politicized.

Google should rectify this situation and immediately include the proper name for the Persian Gulf in Google Maps and all of its informational products. The exclusion of the title of the Persian Gulf diminishes your applications as informational tools, and raises questions about the integrity and accuracy of information provided by Google.

We strongly urge you to stay true to Google’s mission – “to organize the world’s information and make it universally accessible and useful” – without distorting or politicizing that information. We look forward to an explanation from you regarding the recent removal of the Persian Gulf name from Google Maps and call on you to immediately correct this mistake.

Sincerely,

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